Declarative Memory

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Declarative Memory “consists of facts and events that can be consciously recalled or “declared.” Also known as explicit memory, it is based on the concept that this type of memory consists of information that can be explicitly stored and retrieved.”1

“Examples of declarative memory at work are the recollection of phone numbers or our knowledge of the world’s capital cities. In order to maintain memories of this nature, we need to be explicitly associated with the events in question.”2

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Notes

  1. https://www.livescience.com/43153-declarative-memory.html
  2. https://explorable.com/declarative-memory
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